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and in iran nuclear program continues to progress. look at the foreign policy challenges facing the united states in 2013. because youry wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ >> from iran's nuclear ambition toss china's nationalist im
these jobs, foreign policy is my passion, and yet actually i'm also a mother and i want to be at home for the last five years that my children are at home and it was hard for me to admit that to myself but in the end i had to recognize both as a matter of need and want that my life was going to go in a different direction than i had always expected it would, and i had to listen to that and i had to in the end kind of say, wow, maybe i'm not quite the same person i thought i was, but i know this is the right thing for me to do. >> what was the most difficult part of your job in relation to balancing it with your role as a mother? >> it was just that sense so often where, you know, particularly my oldest son really needed me home, needed us both there, and i was in another place, and i could not do anything about that. you know, i think that is true for millions of parents and certainly millions of women, and i realized the stress was just overwhelming of knowing that i had a child who really did need me and i couldn't respond. i couldn't live up to that responsibility. >> after you cam
and jewish statements. is he too liberal on foreign policy for republicans or just too close to obama? well, we're going to tell you why the hagel fight matters, even if he becomes another causality of washington's angry nomination process. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ...could end with adding a close friend. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> i think all 100 senators ought to be on the line on this. what do you believe? what are you willing to support? what do you think? why are you elected, because you wanted a safe job? go sell shoes. this is a tough business. but is it any tougher, us having to take a tough vote, express ourselves, and have the courage to step up than what we're asking our young men and women to do? i don't think so. >> by opposing george w. bush's iraq surge in 2007, chuck hagel endeared himself to anti-war democrats but lost a lot of republican support. now while president obama's next potential secretary of defense is being hailed by some precisely because h
of john kerry, what does u.s. foreign policy gain and lose with kerry at the helm here. as we both know, secretary clinton had broad name recognition and on the flip side, some say john kerry comes with far more experience than when secretary clinton took up the job. >> well, obviously, this is, i believe, one of the most qualified individuals in the country and ever to be nominated secretary of state. these are his assets and one, he's participated the last 30 years in the major foreign policy debates in the country so deep knowledge. secondly, he's a combat veteran and a war hero so he knows the scourges of war and military involvement and thirdly, he's a man of the congress and one of the big problems in the state department is that they don't get funded for embassy security and consulate security like in benghazi. kerry can bring his enormous prestige as a senator for many years to get that funding. he's almost become president and foreign leaders respect him and the most important element, richard is his relationship with the president. it's a strong one. he's carried out a lot of
obama's foreign policy is feckless and weak? >> i'm saying, you make your own decision. two years ago the middle east was a stable place, a government that was pro-american. they were not at war with israel. fast forward two years later, we have been very involved in toppling those dictators in the middle east but we have stepped back as those countries struggled to find new governments. they found islamist governments. we did not help them in pro democracy election. whether you talk about libya, vipt or any of the countries they were all a lot worse off than two years ago. i think the secretary of state has a lot to answer for and to explain why. what did do wrong to have the policies that have allowed the united states essentially to be blamed for most of the problems in the middle east today. >> gregg: the benghazi diplomatic mission was going to be a dangerous place. there had been previous attacks in and around it before the september 11th terror attack that killed four individuals. should we ask pretty direct questions about why you weren't protecting those people? >> yeah. what
a half of his face because he's brilliant domestically, troubled on foreign policy. but he had a good side image so i think you could have half of him. >> can you do that? >> they can do do anything they want. >> she's the one -- >> half a face. >> so we've already talked about fdr. we've talked about truman. let's talk about reagan, a guy who when many people on the left thought he stumbled into office as an accident of history, few could expect this guy to be as transformative as he was. i would guess most historians 100 years from now will talk about the 20th century, they'll talk about fdr and reagan. >> well, there's no question. having created -- i mean, fdr creating a generation of liberal followers and reagan creating a generation of conservative followers, changing the whole idea of what we thought about government, whether one agrees or not, dealing with the cold war, being able to finally bring about that partnership with gorbachev, you know, take that wall down, the strength he showed, the communication ability, the fact that people felt optimistic during his time, the fac
in the second term? >> hegel used on foreign policy, but he hasn't received a lot of criticism. how much of that is justified? i can't tell you. >> senator from vermont, we thank you for joining us the day after christmas. >> joining us to talk big picture and the president's second term cabinet, nbc editor mark murray was the december employee of the month. congratulations. >> excuse me. you heard from senator sanders saying the lack of urgency hasn't been a problem, but if you look at it for all intents and purposes, boehner removed himself from these discussions. harry reid, president obama, and a little bit of mitch mcconnell. what is possible of making a deal? >> the ball seems to be in mitch mcconnell's court. does he filibuster anything that harry reid ends up making with president obama? we have a paired down legislation extending for income below $250,000 and doing something with unemployment insurance that you were talking about? the question is a senate filibuster, democrats need 60 votes and republican votes, mcconnell ends up filibustering and will there be senators who supp
's not forget about the rest of the world where any number of foreign policy entanglements could overwhelm the most carefully laid plans. let's bring in dana milbank and msnbc contributor jonathan capehart also of the "washington post" to help me sort out how does a man get it done in the second term? dana, you know, they say that the second term a president really has about 18 months to get anything done and after that you're pretty much a lame duck. now, of all the things i just listed, what do you think he should and what do you think he will try to tackle first? >> well, karen, first of all, i don't think he needs to surrender to the idea that he only has that 18-month period. it's not without precedent to achieve things later in the term. so, first of all, it's not necessarily such a narrow window. the other thing is assuming we have to do something with the fiscal cliff here, but even once that's done and presume lbl awhat we're looking at now is more of a smaller short-term fix, that doesn't mean he's going to take his eye off the economy. he learned the lesson of this early in his
one of the foreign policy hurdles facing the president in his second term. here to break down all of those is retired army colonel and medal of honor recipient jack jacobs. is he also an msnbc military analyst and the author of basic surviving boot camp and basic training. jack, it's good to see you here, and as we talk about what we're watching in afghanistan, based on this recent news, obviously this has to be a factor in what the president and the advisors, his generals, tell him about the withdrawal. what does if mean for the contemplation of that early withdrawal from afghanistan? >> well, the irony is that as we reduce combat troops, incidents like this, that will continue in any case, then become more prominent, but no matter how many combat troops we actually withdraw from afghanistan, in the end the president is going to decide to leave a certain number of advisors there for a certain period of time and these attacks, these green on blue attacks are going to continue, and they're going to become more prominent as we withdraw american forces. fwloo what does it mean for ha
to ask him, not just about israel, but to me the most significant foreign policy challenge for president obama in our country and the world in the next year or two is iran and the nuclear weapons program. chuck hagel has had some outlying votes on that. >> i don't think he will get many republican votes. i like chuck, but his positions i didn't frankly know all of them, are really out of the mainstream and well to the left of the president. >> so on iran, hagel cast some votes not supporting iranian sanctions. on israel, these marks that he's made in the past, coming back to haunt him now. we'll have on-to-see in coming days if it becomes the fact that hagel is white house nominee. >> such an odd situation. the whole idea of nominating hagel it would be a bipartisan choice. he is a republican. former republican senator, who would be in a democratic administration. republicans are out against him. have you heard of any support for him in this process? >> well, you know there, are people who are coming out and supporting him. public letters from former, very prominent generals, admirals, a
of the obama administration foreign policy. remember this was their big success, leading from behind. it fits into the administration narrative that the war on terror is over. that al qaeda has been defeated. that the arab spring has brought democracy to libya and the middle east. all that was disproven by the tragedy in benghazi on september the 11th and i think these are all questions senators want to hear answers to. gregg: do you think she and president obama both were convinced that the war on terror was over an al qaeda was defeated? >> yeah. i think their world view is badly misguided and i think it was ideology more than anything else that convinced them that certainly this could not have been a terrorist attack. it must have been a response by some demonstration, protesting the mohammed video, getting out of control. a lot of people in congress have said the mohammed video story was a cover-up. i actually hope for the good of the country that is true because at least it would demonstrate that the president understood reality. he was trying to sweep it aside. i'm worried that the ideo
? >> so in fact it very important to our foreign policy and we're exporting our way of thinking of intellectual property. >> this is treasury secretary tim geithner slamming china on exactly this. >> we're seeing china continue to be very, very aggressive in a tragedy that they started decades ago which goes like this, we want you to tell to our country, we want you to come produce here. if you want to come produce here, we want to you export from china. if you want to come to produce here, you need to transfer your technology to us. and they have made possible systematic stealing of intellectual property of american companies and have not been aggressive in putting in the protection for the intellectual property that everyone needs. >> this is one of the big objectives is making sure that there are legal agreements in place that are going to export our intellectual property regime. >> right. and economic espionage is something that could be draining america of economy. what i'm trying to get is a balance between the public access and the investors incentive and that's where we'
significant foreign policy challenge for president obama and our country and the world in the next year or two is iran and its nuclear weapons program. chuck hagel has had some very outlying votes on that. >> i don't think he's going to get republican votes. i like chuck, but his positions, i didn't really quite frankly nomo all know all of them. >> senator lindsey graham, very prominent senator, already some of hagel's own republican party coming up against him. >> we'll see if this campaign against him is effective enough, i guess, barbara, in order for this nomination not to happen at all. this is the big open question with regards to chuck hagel. barbara, we'll keep in touch on this story throughout the coming hours. barbara starr at the pentagon. >>> it is the bottom of the hour. i'm hala gorani in washington, d.c. in for brooke baldwin today. this year definitely had its share of crime stories. some capturing international attention and outrage. others were filled with disturbing details almost too hard to believe. here is randi kaye with the top ten crime and punishment stories of 2012.
to breathe. i'm joined by a washington-based journalist who specializes in foreign policy. she attended a university in new delhi and has personally experienced what i understand is groping on public transportation. tell us, first of all, what is the -- what is going on? what is happening there that you've got even over the last, you know, years or so more than a tenfold increase in the past 40 years in india of this kind of violence against women. >> it's always been the case. it's not new as such. to be a woman in india is not an easy proposition. every woman has experienced some kind of abuse on public transportation, lewd remarks on the streets if you're walking down. no matter how conservatively you're dressed, you're still, you know, open season for the men. there is just a lot of reasons why this happens. patriarchal system is one, a lack of policing is another, and general treatment of women, which is not equal to men, even though it may be so under the law. >> you say you personally have experienced this as well. can you tell us about that. >> yes. i was a student at new delhi
with the united states government and that is, i'll support you are foreign policy initiatives in the region by and large if you stay out of my internal affairs. i think that's where he is right now. it appears like the united states government is doing just that. heather: take this beyond the borders of egypt to the area of the middle east, what does this mean for the rest of the ream on? >> well, it is pretty significant. egypt is the a very influential country. even though it is one of the poorest countries in the region, it is a powerful arab country. it has a powerful military for sure and has significant intellectual and cultural influence on the region. so what goes on in egypt truly matters. listen, the contours of this revolutionary change taking place in the middle east, certainly the catalyst for it was democratic and social reform and economic opportunity but the radicals, the muslim brotherhood, are easy seeing the opportunity to advantage themselves geopolitically in the region. that is the danger here. that this continues to move in that direction in other parts of the region.
it means to our own foreign policy. we asked the question yesterday if syria is blowing up and there's defections i will ask ambassador john bolt upon coming up why is it our responsibility? kelly, the u.s. always has to get involved but with tens of thousands people there being killed already maybe it is time. kelly: the ambassador will shed some light on that. i'm looking forward to the conversation as well. definitely something we'll be discussing. meantime, jamie, there are new weather warnings and out there and details on weather delays. we're tracking a massiveo# storm moving across theo# country this busy day aftero# christmas. jamie: a deadly tanker trucko# explosion shuts down a majoro# highway in one of america'so# busiest cities.o# if it is not hard enough to get around how about trying to maneuver around this? we'll tell you what happened. kelly: new details on the deadly ambush that killed two firefighters in webster new york. >> we're being shot at. i am shot. assault rifles. we have multiple firemen down. working fire. [ cellphone chirping ] [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive
country as great as it is. that foreign policy record we have is something to be proud of. that is not to say we should be putting boots on the ground or putting our men and women in harm's way but i think we do have an opportunity, or at least, you know, a chance to start to comprise some policies that could help steer syria out of this and also we obviously need to be worrying about iran, its nuclear program and its meddling in the politics and policies of some of our allies in the region. jamie: i'm not exaggerating, but sometimes i lock my door at night i think about iran. it is so scary. if people don't follow it they should. we're a little stretched now in the united states. we have boots on the ground and we have a lot of other things. it is very difficult to get intel on iran. they are surely fueling syria and all the violence that's going on there. even russia has been a bit hands off. what could we do? >> well, you know, first of all, iran's fingerprints are all over syria. i think that is undeniable. they continue to help the syrians crack down on this insurrect
attack in benghazi injected foreign policy into the race. >> justice will be done. >> reporter: a week later, the campaign shifted again to the hidden cram ra video of romney's comments on the 47% and an instant obama attack ad. number four, among the year's biggest moments. >> there are 47% of him who are with him. >> reporter: the gop needed a breakout moment and got one at number three. the debates and president obama's lackluster performance in the first face-off put romney back in the hunt. the president would have to redeem himself and polls show that he did. >> i said if i got bin laden in our sights, i would take that shot. >> reporter: but at number two came the mother of october surprises. sandy. the devastating superstorm put much of the nation's focus on the president's handling of the crisis. and the high marks he received from a top romney surrogate, new jersey governor, chris christie. >> i can't thank the president enough for his personal concern and passion for our state. >> reporter: polls show the race moving towards the president who won handedly. >> this is he elec
on foreign relations, author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." and in washington, vice president and executive editor of and msnbc political analyst, richard wolffe. a minor round of applause for richard wolffe. >> one hand clapping. >> first of all, can anybody here come up with a synonym -- i don't care what it is -- so we don't have to employ the phrase "fiscal cliff" at all during the day? any ideas? anybody got any -- >> how about deadline? >> how about do your job. how about just do your job time. it is ridiculous. a little news, then we'll chatter about this. as if tax hikes and spending cuts weren't enough, there's a new reminder that the nation's debt ceiling is also hanging over the budget talks in washington. in a letter to congress yesterday, treasury secretary timothy geithner warned the government would hit its legal borrow i borrowing limit i limit by monday. geithner says the treasury will be forced to take, quote, extraordinary measures to keep paying the bills. he also referenced the impending fiscal cliff, which thr
the right pick? does that make him a defense expert? >> no. he is not a defense expert dave. foreign policy expert. what we need in a very complex world today ratcheted by wars in afghanistan. cyber war. threats from iran, north korea, china, et cetera. and a defense department has more than 3 million people scattered across this world. it's someone that really understands defense. someone that's spent their entire life working the bureaucracy that knows the industrial base that knows soldiers. you know, i have nothing against senator hagel. he is a fine man. i have met him before. i think he is well-intended. but what we need are people like michelle floornoid. ash hammer. we need people who know the systems inside-out. the president needs the best advice in a time of war and time of crisis. we are forcing says questions station. tenuous time for armed forces given all these threats. >> dave: after what john boehner said on friday it looks like sequestration could actually happen. the question is why does the president want chuck hagel. when you look at his background. maybe not a defense
meant that a foreign power or be a overreaching central government would have to think twice before quartering soldiers in our houses without permission or imposing through force policy that is a vast majority of americans wanted to resist to the death. bearing arms is a symbol we're a free people and we control our own destiny. guns became powerful cultural symbol passed from parents to children that includes a respect for nature and a hunting culture that values self-sufficiency and natural food. for the longest time the gun control debate pitted mostly rural americans against urban elites who sometimes fail to respect rural values. i ran for congress in a district with a strong second amendment tradition and i have been around guns my entire life. but i saw the knee-jerk extremism that the right wing caricature of gun control caused with extremist groups like the nra asking, well, what about guns in bars. if you don't support it, you're an enemy of the second amendment. what about guns in church, at the hospital. what about buying ten guns at once? democrats supporting any restri
evaluating the investment landscape in india. obviously we've seen a lot of foreign investors allocate capital into this market. we are looking at the rupee depreciating significantly over the last year. the company dealing with other problems including lack of infrastructure, some policy changes. what is your recent -- i guess your updated outlook on india going forward? >> well, the local market has justice done phenomenally in 2012. up 25%. but it didn't help u.s. dollar investors because the currency fell the same amount. so really everyone kind of broke even even though the market took off this year. i think india is still a market where you want to keep building positions gradually over time. there's been a lot of issues around the government. i think the instakt around the government and people's predicting how long it will take to push back reforms has impacted the market quite a bit. i think one thing under the surface in india and china that all investors need to be aware of is the fact that corporate debt is now really building up to almost unhealthy levels. and i would keep
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22